Tag Archives: marketing

Each phone call, no matter how negative, is an opportunity…

In these economic times, when it may be harder to get new business, it makes it even more important to do all we can to retain our customers and increase the loyalty factor. It is shocking that day in, day out, we can find so many examples where we are left wondering, why didn’t they do just a little bit more to keep their customers? Why do so many throw away opportunties and not make use of situations where the customer is giving them a chance to obtain business?

Today I overheard my friend talking on the phone and asking a hair salon company for the name of the person who did her hair last time. She thought she did a good job, but couldn’t remember her name, and wanted to schedule another appointment. She described the appearance of the hairstylist and which station she usually worked at until the employee on the phone recoginized who she was referring to. The employee said that the hairstylist my friend wanted did not work there any longer.

My friend was of course disappointed, and stayed on the phone a bit to express how satisfied she was last time and also communicated a mood of not knowing where to go next. The employee apologized, did not say or ask much more, and they said their goodbyes.

You may be wondering, as I am, why did the employee not take the opportunity to strive a little harder to retain the customer? My friend, as evident by her reaction, had some hesitancy and indecisiveness about where to go and what to do next. Even though her preferred stylist was no longer working at the salon, the employee already had my friend on the phone and had first shot in convincing my friend to stay with the company.

Maybe the employee could ask my friend what kind of style she likes and then promote one of the stylists in the salon? The employee should show interest by asking questions and then show that their services can meet the needs of my friend. In these kind of situations, where a customer is disappointed and considering going elsewhere, maybe employees should have the authority to offer discounts and special coupons in an effort to keep the customer? Or how about politely asking the customer if they would like to talk to one of the hairstylists to discuss on a more personal level about the desired look that the customer is after?

Each phone call is an opportunity to improve the customer relationship. The employee probably assumed that because the preferred stylist is not available anymore, this meant the end of the interaction and relationship. It’s up to the employee, especially while the customer is still on the phone, to convince her not to go elsewhere.

-Patrick Law

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Psychology of Gas Prices: When a steal of a deal still leaves you feeling empty…

Gas prices went up. Of course the pending hurricane may have a factor. And the refinery issues. And matters related to supply and demand. But, of course there are other theories. Expressions like “Price gouging” often come up. And then there are many conspiracy theories.

Do you mind if I try my hand at a conspiracy theory? Well, maybe nothing so sophisticated, but at least fly some kites about some wild brainstorms? Like most ponderings that we stretch far, there may not be much accuracy to what I muse, but I’m going to go ahead anyway.

We were warned last night on the news that gas prices would take a significant jump today. People were advised to go fill up their pumps prior to sunrise today, and footage of lineups building at gas stations were evident all over. I was one of those people who filled up last night. The psychology of it all, the resulting feelings I had from filling my tank at a deliberately chosen time, surprised me both last night and well into today.

I was giddy. Yes, that may be the appropriate word to describe my state. Yes, despite, these troubling economic times, I was giddy and rather satisfied with myself for being up with the news and acting upon the information. This morning, while driving to work, and hearing how gas prices were steadily rising, and watching cars line up at stations, I was elated I wasn’t one of them. Indeed, I thought, I got a great deal! What a bargain! Instead of paying close to 1.40/L, I paid 1.23/L just last night.

I’m ashamed. 1.23 is not anywhere near cheap, affordable, nor reasonable, but here I was celebrating that fact. May the ‘powers-to-be/powers-that-are’ take note of this sentiment and use this kind of psychology to manipulate and even ‘gouge’? May marketing and advertising take advantage of this consumer weakness and strategically fluctuate pricing to make us think we’re getting a steal when they are actually stealing from us?

Of course, now I notice my foolishness and I am not giddy, not ecstatic, not thinking that I was one of the lucky ones. But, admittedly, just momentarily, I did feel satisfied with my purchase. So if those forces up high can get many consumers, at one time or another, to just even fleetingly feel a short moment of impulsive satisfaction at believing a high price is actually a bargain, to celebrate even just briefly because they see others being ripped off more, then those forces up there must be mighty rich.

Again, this is more or less a conspiracy theory, so really there is not much actual truth to the reasons suggested for the price increases. But, perhaps it can also be worthwhile as a piece of self-reflection, self-criticism, at myself.

I filled up my tank opportunistically last night, but this morning, today, I still feel like I’m running on empty.

-Patrick Law

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Filed under Detours: Psychology of Driving, News

Creating Opportunities with ‘Accidental’ Visitors

When a visitor enters your premises, but is actually in the wrong place and looking for something/somewhere else, how do you usually respond? I think most of us quickly relay to the visitor that the current place is not correct and politely give directions to the desired location. That’s what I usually do.

Upon reflection, can this be a great opportunity to pump up customer service and promote the place that you work at? Even if the visitor did not intend to come to your place, if we create a strong impression, they may return in the future. And, instead of just quickly pointing the visitor to another direction, are we able to combine this with a quick sentence or two introducing what we do and what our services are?

We naturally think of keeping our regular customers satisfied and targeting specific customers to attract, but perhaps awareness to the potential of ‘accidental’ customers can create unexpected opportunities.

-Patrick Law

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Commercialization of Hockey: The Shootout

Perhaps I am making a little bit too much of this but I guess, from a purest standpoint, I felt some discomfort watching the latest Gatorade Sidney Crosby commercial. As you can see from the video above, they select the shootout as being the most important, most clutch, most heroic moment that defines a player.

However, in the NHL, there are no shootouts during the playoffs and shootouts do not determine championships. To me, it just felt kind of anti-climatic, with the build-up, the music, and then a shootout which almost individualizes and trivializes what is a great team sport.

But, I guess we are reminded that this is entertainment, and the most marketable aspects of the game must be chosen to attract people. However, I still can’t help feeling that this kind of commercialization glamorizes certain components that in reality contribute very little to what it truly means to be a clutch hero and leader in sports.

-Patrick Law

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Filed under Sports and Fitness